Place 2 how-to wants to be a reference in the field of personal growth and development, business and success, and to provide its audience with the most professional articles in the world.

How to replace negative thoughts with optimism with the help of ABC technique?

Study guide




Sepehr had been working hard on a report all week. There was nothing left to do. You will be proud when he delivers the report to his boss for review and correction. He was sure that the boss would definitely praise the quality of his work.

However, the boss frowned as he read the report, and a few moments later returned the report to Sepehr, saying, “I thought you did the card well. “You have to work on section two again and add the figures I sent you last night so that it is ready to be presented to the board.”

Sepehr returned to his office unhappy. He had worked hard on the report, but from the boss’s point of view, it was not a complete report. In a bad mood, he added the figures that the boss had said to the report, wondering how much time was left until he was demoted or fired. For the rest of the day, he could not get the frown out of his mind. He was already bored and bored, and this bad mood affected his work; For example, he forgot to date an important customer because his mind was still on the report.

It is clear that Sepehr has exaggerated the story. With this pessimistic view, he thinks of the worst things and catastrophizes a small problem in his mind.

how about you? Are you optimistic or if you were Sepehr, would you react like him?

We have all been proven that optimists are happier, healthier, more efficient and more successful than pessimists. The good news is that optimism is a skill; So you can learn to be optimistic. In this article, we will show you how to use the ABC method to have a more optimistic outlook.

Introduction of ABC technique

This approach was originally developed by psychologist Dr. Albert Ellis, and was later modified by Dr. Martin Seligman, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania and former president of the American Psychological Association. Seligman’s revised version was published in 1990 in his book Learned Optimism.

ABC is the following English vocabulary:

  • Adversity: difficulty
  • Beliefs: beliefs
  • Consequences

In short, we encounter difficulty (or, according to Dr. Ellis’ original model, an activating event). The way we think about this difficulty builds our beliefs. Then, these beliefs affect our behaviors and the result is consequences.

Let us illustrate these definitions with an example: You yell at your assistant because he forgot to print an important report before the meeting (Adversity). Then, you think to yourself, “I’m really a bad boss” (Belief). Now during the session, you show poor performance as a result of this belief, because your self-confidence has decreased (Consequences).

There is an important point between hardship and belief. When you face difficulties, the way you understand and explain these difficulties to yourself directly affects your mindset and relationships. Seligman calls this stage “explanatory style” and says it is a habit that affects your overall outlook on life.

Our explanatory style has three dimensions:

1. Durability

Pessimists subconsciously assume that the causes of bad events are permanent; While optimists believe that bad things are temporary.

For example, imagine you had a bad day and had no time at all to help a co-worker who needed your expertise. A pessimist thinks to himself, “I can never be friends with anyone at work, because I am a good friend,” but the optimist says to himself, “I was a bad friend today.”

The difference between the two beliefs may seem small, but the impact on our perspective is very important!

۲. Learning

Pessimists make general statements about their lives when faced with adversity or trouble; Optimists, on the other hand, make certain statements about a particular event.

For example, the pessimist may say, “All my reports are in trouble,” but the optimist may say, “This report was in trouble.”

In this case, too, the difference is small. Pessimists turn a negative event into a catastrophe that affects their work and life; If, however, optimists think that they may have made a mistake in this part of their work or life, they will not allow this mistake to affect other parts of their lives.

3. Personalize

When we experience a bad event, we have two ways of thinking about it. We can blame ourselves for this bad thing (give it an inner face) or we can blame something or someone other than ourselves (give it an outer face).

Pessimists often give inwardly to blame. They think, “It’s all my fault” or “I’m too dumb to do this.” Optimists have higher self-esteem because they often look back on blame and think, for example, “It’s all someone’s fault” or “I still need practice to acquire this skill, which is why I can not do it right now.” “I will do well.”

Remember that hardship does not always lead to negative beliefs. Whether or not negative beliefs take shape depends on that particular event and your explanatory style.

So, is there a way to correct the ABC pattern (difficulty, beliefs, consequences)?

Step 1: Follow the course of the internal conversations

Start with a notebook. Your job is to listen to your inner conversations for a few days; Especially when you are facing a difficult or stressful situation. Then, write these conversations in a notebook.

Try the difficulty of each situation, the beliefs that form in your mind after encountering that difficulty, and then write down the consequences of those beliefs.

Consequences can be anything; From happy or sad thoughts and feelings to the specific actions you take.

Example

Difficulty: A colleague criticized my product idea in front of the team during the weekly meeting.

Belief: He is right. It was a stupid idea. My imagination is not strong and now everyone knows that I am not a creative person at all. I should not have spoken at all. I made a mistake!

Consequences: I felt stupid and did not speak at all until the end of the session. I no longer want to attend any of the group meetings this week. I even have an excuse not to attend tomorrow’s meeting.

Step 2: Analyze the results

Take a look at your writing when, after a few days, you record different situations with descriptions of their difficulties, beliefs, and consequences.

At this point, you need to look for patterns in your thinking; Pay particular attention to how each of these general beliefs has led to specific consequences.

To be optimistic, you need to change your beliefs after facing problems. This change of belief will prevent negative consequences.

Step 3: Use mindfulness and discussion

As you can see, your beliefs play an important role in your life after adversity and indicate whether you are optimistic or pessimistic. This indicates the importance of managing and correcting the negative ABC pattern.

There are two ways to correct a negative thought pattern: mental engagement and discussion.

Mental preoccupation

If you want to stop your negative thoughts, you have to focus on something else. There is no point in just saying “don’t think negatively” to yourself. You need to break the cycle of negative thoughts.

To interrupt, as soon as negative beliefs form, focus on something else.

For example, put a rubber band around your wrist. When faced with a stressful situation and your brain begins to weave negatively, pull the strap around your wrist to avoid being hit by the skin of your wrist from being hypnotized by negative thoughts. This corporal punishment reminds you to get out of the cycle of negative thoughts.

When you break the cycle of negative thoughts, you need to focus on something else. Think seriously about something else for a minute.

Discuss

While mindfulness is helpful in interrupting negative thinking, the more permanent solution is to deal with it. After difficulty, beliefs and consequences, Disputation is in fourth place.

To do this, you need to reason logically with yourself and challenge the elements of the process. In particular, look for assumptions that are wrong in your own explanatory style that we have already mentioned.

In the following, we will use the previous examples to illustrate this idea.

Difficulty: A colleague criticized my product idea in front of the team during the weekly meeting.

Belief: He is right. It was a silly idea. My imagination is not strong and now everyone knows that I am not a creative person at all. I should not have spoken at all. I made a mistake!

Consequences: I felt stupid and did not speak at all until the end of the session. I no longer want to attend any of the group meetings this week. I even have an excuse not to attend tomorrow’s meeting.

Discussion: I have made the issue too big. My colleague had the right to take revenge on my idea. His criticism was not personal and was accurate and calculated. After the meeting, he even praised my creative thinking. All I have to do is think again about my ideas.

Tip 1:

Challenging negative thoughts is a good way to build confidence.

Tip 2:

Energization can be placed in the fifth place of the thought pattern. At this stage, you have the patience to think about the positive feelings, behaviors, and actions that result from the optimism of your perspective.

.



How to replace negative thoughts with optimism with the help of ABC technique?

We will be happy to hear your thoughts

Leave a reply

place 2 how-to
Logo
Enable registration in settings - general